Your Gender Won’t Stop Me From Loving You

If you’re a woman

Then I stand with you in solidarity

You’re free to embrace your feminine

And masculine energy

You can express yourself how you choose

Only you own your body

No one else can tell you

The kind of woman you should be.

.

If you’re a man

You can be strong and together

Or you can fall apart in a puddle of tears

There’s feelings that flow through us

For all these years

So of course let them go

Without holding onto social fears.

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If you’re nonbinary

I respect you

And I want you to always live your truth

And if you think the world sees you

As a little too much “he”

Or a little too much “she”

Give it time, I know you’ll make them see

Who it is you really want to be.

.

If you don’t know what your gender is

Or if you’re confused or lost

Or afraid to find the truth

Because you’re worried about the cost

Don’t worry, I’m here

And many others are, too

You don’t have to have it figured out

Either way, I’ll support you.

.

Your gender is a part of you

It won’t stop me from loving you.

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Where do English Majors Work? A Guide to Finding the Best Environment for You

Hello there 🙂 Welcome to another post where I discuss the possibilities for people with English (or other humanities) degrees ❤ English degree holders can be found working in a variety of different settings, filling a variety of roles. Understanding which environments you would thrive in can help give you clarity on your career path. So, where do English degree holders work? Here are some options:

Magazines: What English major wouldn’t want to work for a magazine? Chances are, you’ve already worked for one on campus. Writing is the first gig that comes to mind, but there are other positions, too, like being an editorial assistant, ad sales rep, PR specialist, photo editor (if you have skills in digital photo editing), column editor, editor in chief, and more.

This is a creative field and the publishing world is small, so of course you can expect a lot of competition. You may have to relocate to a major city if you don’t already live in one. However, sometimes local opportunities in suburban areas can still be found. You may also be able to work as a freelance writer.

Newspapers: This is of course the natural fit for someone who enjoys journalism. If you’re curious, enjoy uncovering the truth, and like working in a fast-paced, busy environment, then this could be a good career path for you. In addition being a reporter, you can also find a position as a copy editor, column editor, editor in chief, art director, data scientist, fact checker, news assistant, marketing specialist, videographer (if you have film and video production skills), and others.

Like magazines, this is a creative and, consequently, a highly competitive field. There should be local opportunities, but of course the best jobs will come from high profile papers (i.e- The New York Times). Like with magazines, it is possible to write for different newspapers as a freelance reporter.

Publishing Companies: Book publishers are probably the first thing that come to mind when thinking of English major careers. All of us probably dream of working for a big company like Simon and Schuster at some point or another. This is one field where networking is your best friend because, as you probably guessed, it is super competitive. Positions at publishing companies include working in: editorial, publicity, marketing, sales, subsidiary rights, management, design, and public relations. This is another field where you usually have to live in a major city, like NYC or Boston, to find opportunities.

Advertising, Marketing, and Public Relations Agencies: All three of these agencies have distinctly different functions, but these days those functions tend to overlap, especially when it comes to digital media. One thing all of these companies have in common is that they need good writers. Getting your foot in the door, and working for an agency for a few years, can also make it easier to get a job later in the marketing or PR department of a larger company.

Ad agencies are notorious for their “company cultures,” often having fun, colorful offices and allowing their employees to work on comfy couches. That said, it’s a lot of work with tight deadlines, and working overtime is common. Like with the fields mentioned above, you can expect a lot of competition for jobs. Managers in these companies can make six figures, which makes working up to those jobs desirable for many. Freelance writing and design opportunities can be found here as well.

Human Resources and Staffing Agencies: Breaking into the HR world can be a challenge. Most jobs want you to have several years of experience, some require you to have a background in accounting or knowledge of payroll, and entry level positions are hard to come by, even for people who have degrees in Human Resources Management.

However, finding a position as a recruiter, specialist, or generalist, especially for a staffing agency, is not impossible. Networking, informational interviews, and having conversations with people already doing what you want to do are you best bet for getting in. You may also consider pursuing a masters degree in HR Management if you feel it is the best path for you.

Law Firms: English degree holders often find positions in law firms as administrative assistants, legal secretaries, and sometimes as paralegals. If you have attention to detail and can handle an environment where each case is important or urgent, this career path can provide you with stability and decent pay. You may also consider earning a certificate in Paralegal Studies, or pursuing a law degree. Keep in mind that the job market for lawyers is a bit over saturated these days. Check the employment rates in your state to learn more about the likelihood of finding work where you live.

Nonprofits and Government Agencies: Like many for-profit companies, nonprofits also need good writers. You may find a position working on grant proposals or fundraising letters. There are also jobs for fundraisers, social medial managers, communications specialists, administrative assistants, public relations specialist, program coordinators, community outreach specialists, managers, and others.

Smaller, local nonprofits may not be able to pay you, but getting volunteer experience could be a good way to network and add to your resume. Larger nonprofits in major cities are your best bet for finding full-time work. The key is to find an organization with a large annual budget (think over $1 Million a year).

Software, IT, and Technology Companies: It may seem like technology and English don’t mix, but the truth is, some English degree holders do pursue careers in this field. Writing is both creative and logical, and web design and development can be similar in this way.

If you minored in computer science, or simply have an interest in math and computers, you may be able to work as a technical writer, web designer, or web developer (some of these positions may require you to further you education, whether this is by earning another degree or developing the skills). You may also find an entry level position as an administrative assistant, marketing assistant, or tech support specialist.

Language Schools: You may have to further your education a bit for this one. But if you want to invest the time and money into earning a certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language, it could be worth the effort. (The most common certificate is the CELTA, and it’s an intensive program that takes one month to complete full time, and about two or three months to complete part-time).

On the down side, teaching positions at language schools tend to be part time, causing some to work two or three jobs at different schools to make ends meet. On the plus side, full time work is still possible to find, and possessing a CELTA with your English degree can allow you to work in almost any country in the world. It’s a perfect option for people who want to travel. Some countries, like China, will allow you to teach English with just your bachelor’s degree. It would be an adventure, that’s for sure, and just think of the stories you could tell your grand kids.

Financial Services Companies: Working for a finance or insurance company is not exactly your typical English major’s dream job, but jobs in this field tend to be open to people with any degree, typically as general office clerks or phone reps. Not the most exciting option, but it’s out there.

Schools and Universities: If you decide to pursue a masters or PhD, working as a university professor is competitive, but possible. Adjunct professors don’t earn much money, but it can be a good way to get teaching experience. You may also get a masters degree in Education if you want to teach preschool, elementary, middle, or high school. Sometimes schools will also hire administrative assistants, marketing or fundraising specialists, social media managers, or PR specialists.

Graduate School: You may wish to pursue a master’s or PhD if you want to find focus or open more doors in your career. You can study anything provided you’re willing to spend a couple semesters earning the prerequisites you need, but degrees that work well with a foundation in English include: English, Creative Writing, Education, Law, Social Work, Marketing, Public Relations, Business Administration, and Nonprofit Management. Pursuing a degree in medicine, computer science, engineering, or accounting is not unheard of for humanities degree holders either.

There are many career paths you can pursue with an English degree. Writers and communications experts are needed in every industry. The downside to this, of course, is that writing is a popular job, and so there is a lot of competition. Networking and talking to people in your industry is the best way to find opportunities. Be persistent and don’t settle. You deserve to find work you love ❤

Train Car Full Of Clowns

In the center of the stage

There was a train car

With blue and pink polka dots

And a big, red horn

.

That people young and old

Always wanted to squeeze

Soft layers of smoke

Drifted along the floor

.

And everyone sipped their soda

Or munched on cotton candy

As they waited for the first clown

They waited, and waited, and waited

.

But nothing happened

People wondered if there were any clowns

In the train at all

Or perhaps they’d fallen asleep

.

When there was the soft, cheerful sound

Of a bicycle bell

It sounded twice, and then one clown

Peaked out from behind the window

.

“Uh oh ladies, gentlemen, and everyone in between

It looks like our first clown is shy

How about making her feel welcome?”

The ringmaster said, stroking his mustache

.

One person in the crowd started clapping

And then several others followed

Until the sound filled the tent like falling rain

With a few people whistling and cheering

.

Maybelle the clown peaked her head

Out from behind the train car door

She let her rainbow hair cover half her face

But brushed it aside when everyone continued to clap

.

Putting one foot in front of the other

She made her way into the spotlight

And as the crowd cheered more and more

She took a bow

.

She picked up a unicycle

That was lying on the ground

Then rode around the tent

To give people flowers

.

That had pink and blue polka dots on them

After that, more clowns came out of the train car

Tall ones, short ones, and ones with pink hair

One carried a sandwich as high as the ceiling

.

And another played the saxophone

Two of them danced with ribbons

And one was just a baby

Who threw candy wrappers into the air

.

And giggled as they fell around him

More and more clowns came out of the train car

Far more than should have been able to fit

One was a large clown who opened a wooden box

.

And set a rainbow of butterflies free

As quickly as the clowns began

They made their way back into the train car

One by one

.

Until the only one left was Maybelle

She stood in the spotlight

With her last pink and blue polka dotted flower

And tossed it into the audience

.

With her eyes closed

After someone caught it

She took her final bow

And made her way back into the train car.

.

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Thanks for reading lovelies ❤ To see more of my work, check out my books at http://ashleylillybooks.weebly.com/

 

 

 

 

Liberal Arts, STEM, and the best degrees for jobs

degree paths2

Figuring out your career path can be tough. After all, who can possibly choose what they want to do for the rest of their life? It’s a lot of pressure to put on someone, especially an 18 year old. Heck, I’m 24, and it’s still a lot of pressure! I like writing about career paths because there’s soooo much I didn’t know when I was an undergrad.

While I don’t think there should be this huge divide between Liberal Arts and STEM degrees, I do feel that most people end up choosing one path over the other, and that these preferences reflect the kinds of careers one would be happiest in. Below, you’ll find a list of the best degrees for employment in each of these paths. This list is more general, and it is by no means all-inclusive.

Let’s start with Liberal Arts. 

degree paths4

Now, this isn’t exactly a list of the best liberal arts degrees. Instead, it’s the best paths of study for people who gravitate toward broad science and humanities subjects. One thing you’ll find is that people who want to study more general subjects, like math, biology, English, or History, will find more opportunities if they pursue masters degrees or PhD’s. Specifically, if they pursue advanced degrees that will increase their chances of finding a job.

Here are some degrees to consider:

Education – I know, there’s nothing more cliche than asking a liberal arts major/degree holder if she wants to be a teacher. We’ve all been asked this at some point! But education is still a great career path for the right person, and a masters degree in this subject will give you an edge. The job outlook is especially good for preschool and elementary school teachers. Elementary school pays more, and so there’s more competition. The jobs are there, though, especially if you are willing to relocate.

Law – I include law school on this list because it’s hard not to. Everyone knows lawyers have some serious earning potential. Unfortunately, many people get law degrees these days, and so competition is fierce, especially if you want to work for a major firm. More jobs are opening up in corporate settings, but it’s not a guaranteed paycheck the way it used to be. Law school is a lot of work, and it’s expensive. Pursue your dreams, but be informed of the reality of the job market.

Social Work – You’ll have the most opportunities in the field with a masters degree in Social Work (MSW). There are many specialties in this field, including: family and children, schools, mental health, and healthcare. There are also many opportunities in nonprofits, the government, universities, politics, and business.

Salaries vary based on specialty, the type of organization you work for, and years of experience. Social Service managers have the highest earning potential. Many positions in this field can lead to burnout, so you have to take good care of yourself. But if you want to help people, and do your research on the realities of your specialty, this can be a worthwhile degree to pursue. The job outlook for a MSW is very good.

Mental Health – Like social work, the job outlook in mental health is good. A bachelor’s degree in psychology may make the job search a bit of a challenge. But a masters degree in mental health counseling, social work, (and maybe psychology or sociology) can often help you find jobs in counseling and therapy. If you have a degree in psych, a PhD can help you start a career as a psychologist, researcher, or professor.

Business – Like law, I add business to this list with a grain of salt. It can provide excellent opportunities as a career path, but as a degree? It depends. Many people get MBAs, have experience, and still struggle to find work. I think part of this is because many jobs in business don’t require a degree in the subject. One can also argue that this degree fits under the STEM umbrella. I include it in this Liberal Arts list because I feel that many creative, lib arts people are drawn to business as well.

This is one field where your bachelor’s degree in art history or philosophy can still pay off. You can find careers in management, marketing, sales, public relations, customer service, and human resources. Some, like marketing, are especially competitive, but these careers can be worth the effort for those who don’t wish to pursue an advanced degree. (Tip: Don’t be afraid to start small and work your way up.)

Economics – Another degree that can fit under the STEM umbrella, economics is probably the highest paying liberal arts subject. Your challenge: advanced classes in math and statistics, and a love of research and data. Are you up for it?? If so, great! A bachelor’s degree in this subject could be the start of a lucrative career with a fair job outlook. You’ll need to get a masters or a PhD for the best opportunities.

Okay, those are a few advanced degree options for my liberal arts loves 🙂 ❤

Let’s move on to STEM. 

degree paths6

In the U.S, everyone is told to get a STEM degree. But even people who eat, sleep, and breathe math and science can choose a less than lucrative degree path. Unlike people who prefer to study the liberal arts, people who study STEM have more options to make money with an associates or bachelor’s degree alone (how fancy!!).

Still, people who major in math, biology, chemistry, or even computer science may still struggle to know what to do after graduation. Here is a broad, if not a bit self-explanatory, list of the best degree paths to choose:

Medicine – As far as years of education go, the medical field is by far the most versatile. You can get an associates degree to be a rad tech or ultra sound tech, a bachelor’s degree to be a nurse, a masters to be an advanced nursing practitioner, healthcare administrator, or physician assistant, and of course you can go to medical school. If you enjoy helping people and are comfortable in hospitals and medical offices, a degree in the healthcare field can help you get an in demand job.

While associates degrees or even certificates can be a great way to start your career, keep in mind that they are less versatile than a bachelor’s, making a career change later on a bit more of a challenge. Medical careers also often require you to pass an exam to be certified in your state. Some jobs require you to be on your feet all day, and to sometimes lift and move patients. If you go to medical school, do your research. Specialties with a poor job outlook do exist!

Computer Science – We all know technology is a booming industry. Programmers, web developers, web designers, software engineers, and junior developers are all in demand, and make a good paycheck. Most jobs will want you to have a bachelor’s degree in CS, but some people in the field are self taught, or have a degree in another science, like physics.

This field can be challenging because your degree program won’t teach you many things you need to know for the job, like programming languages. As someone who’s dabbled in learning HTML, CSS, Python, Java, and Ruby, I can say it can be a bit exhausting. It’s an ever changing field, so you need to always learn and stay up to date. Jobs with startups and agencies can lead some people to feel burned out. But if you can dedicate yourself to learning code and staying current, this field can definitely be worth it.

Engineering – Ah, engineering, arguably the coolest STEM career path. It’s one of those areas where many people in the U.S say we’re “falling behind.” Despite these claims, most specialties in engineering have a slower than average job outlook according to the BLS. The job outlook isn’t great for: mechanical, environmental, electrical, and chemical engineers.

I’m not saying you can’t find a job in these subjects. I don’t have an engineering degree, so I can’t say fully. But based on what I’ve read, Civil Engineering offers the most job growth, and you’ll have the best opportunities with a masters degree in the subject. Petroleum engineering also has a good outlook (10% job growth), but I know this specialty depends on the economy and the industry as a whole. Be prepared to study math and physics!

Accounting – Good old, stable accounting. Of course the job outlook here is good. If you have a bachelor’s degree in another subject, but still want to be an accountant, fear not. There are a select few masters programs that are designed for people with BA’s in unrelated subjects. It’s also possible to take core classes at community college, and to apply for a masters after. The best opportunities are found if you sit for the CPA (certified public accountant) exam.

If you pursue this path, you should love numbers, because you’ll be looking at financial records all day! A few months out of the year, such as during tax season, work hours can be long and stressful, but after that, things settle down. Competition is tough to work for a major accounting firm, and those first few years may be stressful, but stick with it! Things get better, especially if you can branch out to work for smaller firms. Many people find having a specialty, like helping small businesses or families with their taxes, to be very rewarding.

Finding a balance between following your passion and paying your bills can be tough. But educating yourself on the best options, and the not so great options, can be a big help. If your heart isn’t in pursuing a new degree, or if you’re no longer in love with your field, don’t worry. Just be persistent. Believe in yourself and find support ❤

Whether choosing a new degree path or exploring career options, knowledge is your key. Learn all you can, be wiser than you were yesterday, and always try your best. You’ve got this ❤

-ATL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do Crystals Work???? – Vlog

A video where I talk a bit about crystal healing ❤ Is this topic interesting to you? Let me know in the comments 🙂

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Thanks for watching ❤ If you like my blog, please consider supporting me by checking out my books. I write poetry and fiction 🙂

http://ashleylillybooks.weebly.com/

A Moment In Time

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I remember sitting on the back porch

Scribbling poetry in my notebook

This was before the yard had turned into a jungle

When I still had a small bike with very thick tires

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There’s no helmet to protect you from adult problems

No knee pads that can keep you from getting your heart broken

I had no concept of time back then

No concept that all of these things would change

.

But in that moment, I had everything I had ever known

This house, this family, this life

It’s not just loss that changed things

It was the growing up

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I had no concept of time

And no knowledge of who I would become

I still don’t know who I’ll become

But I still have that notebook

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It preserves a moment in time for me

A moment where I had everything I could think of having

At a time where I didn’t know that life

Also means letting go.

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Thanks for reading! ❤ If you like my blog, please consider supporting me by checking out my books 🙂

http://ashleylillybooks.weebly.com/

 

Heather’s Gift – Short Story Excerpt – Vlog

Listen to me read an excerpt from my book of short stories ❤

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Thanks for watching! ❤ If you like my blog, please consider supporting me by checking out my books 🙂

http://ashleylillybooks.weebly.com/