I made it to three hundred followers

I started this blog in 2015, after I graduated from college. One of the many pieces of my writing journey. It really makes my day when people like my posts or leave comments. It can be nice knowing that my thoughts, poetry, art, or videos resonated with someone. The people blogging in the WordPress community are so creative, kind, and thoughtful (at least the ones I have come across). It is so nice to see so many people sharing their work, ideas, and stories.

Like many people, I find myself at times wanting to take a break from the internet. (I’m rarely successful at taking such breaks, but hey, I try.) But this blogging platform has been overall positive. I can go onto my feed and see poems, personal essays, and artwork at any time of day or night. Thank you to the people who make this corner of the internet so positive and inspiring. And thank you to the people who have followed my blog or interacted with my posts.

I don’t have a niche blog (I always get bored with trying to write those). I’m just here to be myself and post whatever comes to mind (it’s usually poems). This has been a space where I can say what is on my mind and I am thankful for that. Thank you everyone ❤

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The Two Princesses Who Fell In Love

[This is from a collection of family-friendly LGBT poems I’d been working on. In honor of pride month, I figured I’d share this one. I think we could use more stories about girls finding their princess charming, don’t you? ❤ 🙂 ]

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There once were two princesses

Who fell in love

Princess Mae liked to tame dragons

Who breathed fire in the sky above

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Princess Lotus liked to garden

And cared for her flowers all day

I’m guessing that you’re wondering

How she met Princess Mae

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One day Lotus was watering Daisies

The sun was hot, but she didn’t tire

But then a dragon swooped from the sky

And started breathing fire!

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She had big, scaly wings

And great sharp claws

She didn’t follow any rules

She didn’t follow any laws

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Fire drifted toward the ground

But Lotus wasn’t scared

She just wanted her roses

And her buttercups to be spared

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The dragon was about to land

On a patch of blue tulips

But Princess Mae said, “Stop right there,”

And put her hands on her hips

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She held a silver shield

And a golden lasso

The dragon tried to get away

But she was far too slow

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Mae captured the dragon

And gave her a potion to make her sleep

“Don’t worry,” the princess said to Lotus,

“I’ll take her to the mountains, then set her free.”

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Lotus gave Mae a great big hug

And thanked her for saving her flowers

The next thing she knew, the sun was setting

And the two had been talking for hours

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They talked about dragons and flowers

They talked about parties and tea

They talked about battles and kingdoms

They talked about magic and the sea

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Lotus thought Mae was the bravest,

Smartest, most beautiful princess of all

She asked if she would like to have tea

In the morning, just after dawn

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Lotus agreed, then used her magic lasso

To take the dragon away

And, as promised, the two of them had tea

The very next day

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After tea, Mae showed her the garden

Where they laughed and sang and ran

And that is how the love story

Of Princess Mae and Princess Lotus began.

Identity Politics

Identity is a powerful thing. The more we grow and evolve in life, the more we tend to gain clarity about “who” we are. Some of us find confidence and solidarity in labels: Gay, Strait, Bisexual, Pansexual, Queer, Trans, Nonbinary, Man, Woman, Black, White, Latina, Asian, Deaf, Teacher, Doctor, Nurse, Student, Activist, Artist, Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Pagan, Atheist, and on and on. There are so many identities we can embody and several that can define us all at once.

Often, labels can help us to understand ourselves and our place in the world. This is especially true for minorities and marginalized groups. A simple label can give a person a sense of community, liberation, and something to stand for. Our identities often drive what we want from politicians and social campaigns. We go as far as to label our political stances: Democrat, Republican, Liberal, Conservative, Independent. The very thing that can bring people together can also divide us, creating an Us vs. Them mentality.

Some people don’t like to label themselves at all. Not their sexuality, not their gender, not their race, not their belief system, not their politics. People who prefer not to fit into any one category may find themselves being pressured to choose a side, or to fit neatly into a box that everyone can readily understand and, consequently, judge.

Labels can change over time. A person can go from being an Atheist to a Christian to a Buddhist. A person can go from being a woman to gender-fluid. A person can go from being conservative to liberal. Few people stay in the same boxes their whole lives. We are creatures of change.

I think labels can be valuable. They give us a sense of self and purpose. But I also think fitting into a box can be limiting. When it comes to politics, many (not all) gay people will take a stand for gay rights and social acceptance. Many (not all) women will stand for women’s rights and feminism. Many (not all) immigrants will stand for other immigrants and refugees. But it can create a problem when people only take a stand for their own identities.

If people who are not directly impacted by the struggles faced by the LGBT community, the deaf community, people with developmental disorders, people with mental illnesses, Black people, Hispanic people, etc, aren’t as educated or involved, what does it say about political movements? If our politics are mostly driven by personal experience, how can we expect others to step outside of their own experiences to understand our needs?

I think we need to challenge ourselves to step outside of our own labels. I think sometimes our politics need to transcend our identities. And I think the way we do that is by educating ourselves on the experiences of people who are different from us. Otherwise, we’re stuck in our own bubbles, surrounded by a group (some smaller than others) that understands our struggles and our fight, remaining as unaware of our neighbors as they are of us.

I think it’s important for us to know ourselves. But I also think it’s important for us to build bridges by knowing about others, too.